Key Stats and Facts

Diversity in sport and physical activity is crucially important for reasons of social inclusion and health, as well as for the standard of sporting excellence and the future of local clubs. The statistics demonstrate why the work of Sporting Equals matters.

Participation

THE GOVERNMENT RECOMMENDS PEOPLE SHOULD PARTICIPATE IN AT LEAST 30 MINUTES A DAY OF MODERATE INTENSITY PHYSICAL ACTIVITY ON 5 OR MORE DAYS A WEEK. HOWEVER: 

  • Only 26.1% of Asian women take part in the recommended levels of sport and physical activity (once a week) compared to 31.4% of White British Women. (Active People 9)
  • Asian and Black females have the lowest participation rates (34.3% & 33.9% respectively), compared to White British females 40.8%. .  (Active People 9)
  • Broken down by gender and religion Muslim Females have the lowest participation rates (25.1%) compared to those who have no religion (51.8%). (Active People 9)
  • Overall latent demand is higher for BAME groups (69%) compared to White groups (53%).  Broken down by gender latent demand is highest for BAME females 72% compared to 52% for White females.  (Active People 8)
  • HABITS found that physical activity declines and sedentary behaviours become more common during adolescence, with Asian girls showing a faster decrease in activity than White girls. (Brodersen NH, Steptoe A, Boniface DR, Wardle J, Hillsdon M. Trends physical activity and sedentary behaviour in adolescence: ethnic and socioeconomic differences. British Journal of Sports Medicine 2007)
  • The Child Heart and Health Study in England (CHASE) reported lower physical activity level in British South Asian children compared to White European, Black African or Black Caribbean children, with girls less active than boys. (Obesity and Ethnicity Jan 2011, National Obesity Observatory)
  • Within the most inactive Local Authorities are Manchester (40.24%), Bradford (37.68%), Luton (35.88%), Coventry (36.81%) which all have significantly higher proportions of BAME communities. (Turning the tide of Inactivity, UK Active, January 2014)

Underrepresentation 

  • BAME communities are underrepresented in official positions within sports organisation – only 7% are in the professional workforce, 3.6% in volunteer management and 3% in the coaching workforce. (Identification of workforce and volunteer profiles within sports organisations, Sport Structures/Sport England 2005).
  • 2015 leadership audit indicated only 2 Chairs and 1 CEO out of 63 NGB/Sports Boards and only 3% of Board Members are BAME.
  • There are only 19 Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) coaches in the 552 'top' coaching positions at professional English clubs, (Dr Stephen Bradbury at Loughborough University, and examined what it took to be the top six coaching and management positions at all 92 professional football clubs in the English leagues).

Disadvantage

  • Ethnic minority groups in England are more likely to live in deprived neighbourhoods than the White British majority. In 2011, more than one in three in the Bangladeshi and Pakistani groups lived in a deprived neighbourhood, which is considerably more than any other ethnic groups. (Joseph Rowntree Foundation, Dynamics of Diversity – Evidence from the 2011 Census Centre, Centre on Dynamics of Ethnicity, December 2013)
  • The 2011 Census tells us that the unemployment rate of ethnic minorities is almost twice that of the White British population resulting in greater financial barriers.

THE POTENTIAL BENEFITS OF PARTICIPATING IN SPORT AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, BOTH FOR THE INDIVIDUAL AND WIDER SOCIETY, ARE WIDE-RANGING. THE 'VALUE OF SPORT MONITOR' COMMISSIONED BY SPORT ENGLAND AND UK SPORT SUGGESTS THAT THEY INCLUDE PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH AND WELL-BEING, ACTIVE CITIZENSHIP, CRIME REDUCTION AND COMMUNITY SAFETY, POSITIVE ECONOMIC IMPACT AND REGENERATION OF LOCAL COMMUNITIES, EDUCATION AND LIFELONG LEARNING. 

References can be found next to each individual fact

Key Stats and Facts

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